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Guidance counselors suggest incorporating learning into kids' summer activities

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TWC News: Guidance counselors suggest incorporating learning into kids' summer activities
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Fun in the sun is a must for most kids during the summer months, but parents can still incorporate learning into their summer time activities.

Some guidance counselors say while kids are involved in sports, arts and crafts or even visiting family, make sure they are reading and working on skills necessary for the upcoming school year. While cooking, you can incorporate math into the meal by measuring ingredients.

Experts also suggest that one or two weeks before school starts is not a time for vacation, but a time to make the transition into getting gearing up for school.

A mother who lost her hair while going through chemotherapy developed an idea to help children understand the affects of cancer treatments.

Doctors diagnosed Jane Bingham with an incurable form of Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in 2007. Her daughter was four years old at the time and couldn't understand the hair loss.

Bingham decided to do something to help her daughter and other children. She petitioned toy companies and asked them to manufacture a bald doll to help children understand hair loss, even embrace it. It can represent a child with alopecia, a child diagnosed with cancer or children who have a family member with cancer.

Companies listened: MGA Entertainment created bald Moxie and Bratz dolls as part of a new collection. Mattel also promised to manufacture "beautiful and bald" friends of Barbie.

Experts say lack of exercise is can lead to illnesses. New research shows one in 10 deaths worldwide can be blamed on illnesses caused by lack of exercise. This is about the same as the number of deaths from smoking.

The new research in the medical journal The Lancet shows experts say the problem reached pandemic proportions. When people do not exercise, they are more likely to die from heart disease, type-2 diabetes, plus breast and colon cancer.

The scientists looked at 10 years of research on ways to promote physical activity and identified a number of effective strategies to help us get the 150 minutes of exercise we need each week.

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